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#blackmonth • Find out images about blackmonth via Instagram

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Find out hathanh_14's Instagram I always love you 😊😊 #hup #bright #instagram #allizzwell #blackmonth #gaudtuha 1584266347611771334_3101499306

I always love you 😊😊 #hup #bright #instagram #allizzwell #blackmonth #gaudtuha

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Find out pastelluci's Instagram And again.. and again.. R.I.P. #badmonth #blackmonth #blacksummer #blackholidays 1583358798047021307_633587506

And again.. and again.. R.I.P. #badmonth #blackmonth #blacksummer #blackholidays

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Find out dreams_africa_officiel's Instagram Vous savoir dans notre *Grande* *Famille* *PARADOX* est pour nous quelque de magnifique.⭐🌟✨. Venez Profiter de la grande *PROMOTION*🎊😌que nous offrons durant tout un *mois* pour votre plaisir car à présent vous avez la possibilité de tous vous procurer des articles de votre marque.  Vive le *#BlackMonth*⚫🔴⚪ Vive la *#MaisonParadox*🇨🇲 Vive la *#SuperPromo* 1581433179491148946_1916224317

Vous savoir dans notre *Grande* *Famille* *PARADOX* est pour nous quelque de magnifique.⭐🌟✨. Venez Profiter de la grande *PROMOTION*🎊😌que nous offrons durant tout un *mois* pour votre plaisir car à présent vous avez la possibilité de tous vous procurer des articles de votre marque. Vive le * #BlackMonth*⚫🔴⚪ Vive la * #MaisonParadox*🇨🇲 Vive la * #SuperPromo*

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Find out jinseinoiro's Instagram Espectacular ilustración de: @franwingmartinez 💜 
Gracias por prestarme tu arte!!
#Black #DarkSensations #BlackMonth #Darkness #MesNegro #JinseiNoIro #Blackcolour #Choosyourcolor #Emotions #Illustration #Photodraphy #FirstMonth #child #sadness 1581043378946415755_5828715300

Espectacular ilustración de: @franwingmartinez 💜 Gracias por prestarme tu arte!! #black #darksensations #BlackMonth #darkness #mesnegro #jinseinoiro #blackcolour #choosyourcolor #emotions #illustration #photodraphy #firstmonth #child #sadness

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Find out ethiopianworld_'s Instagram On This Day In TCXPI History

Brownsville Affray 1906

In July 1906, the U.S. Army stationed three companies of the all-black Twenty-Fifth Infantry at Fort Brown, Texas, adjacent to Brownsville.  In recent years, southern Texas and the border region had seen periodic disturbances between American soldiers and local Chicanos who resented the military's presence.  Soon after their arrival, black soldiers began complaining of police harassment and civilian discrimination.

On the night of August 13, a group of unidentified men fired more than a hundred shots into private homes and businesses near the fort, killing a young bartender.  A well-organized citizens' group accused the black infantrymen, prompting a U.S. Inspector General's investigation directed by Major Augustus Penrose. 
Penrose later concluded that a handful of soldiers had knowledge of the shooting, but the shooters' identities could not be discovered because the black troops refused to answer investigators' questions. 
On November 6, claiming a "conspiracy of silence" to protect their guilty comrades, President Theodore Roosevelt announced the dishonorable discharges of 167 men in Companies B, C, and D.  To avoid further trouble with border residents, Fort Brown and neighboring Ringgold Barracks were closed in October.

African-American leaders nationwide condemned Roosevelt's handling of "the Brownsville Affray." One study suggests this event marked the beginning of African Americans's abandonment of their historical loyalty to the Republican Party.  From 1907 to 1910, the U.S. Senate reexamined the case and eventually allowed fourteen infantrymen to reenlist but upheld the summary guilty verdict.  In the 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense reduced the discharges to honorable status.

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#otd
#BlackMonth
#DailyBlackHistoryFact
#OnThisDayInTCXPIHistory 1581038449681535467_5024776273

On This Day In TCXPI History Brownsville Affray 1906 In July 1906, the U.S. Army stationed three companies of the all-black Twenty-Fifth Infantry at Fort Brown, Texas, adjacent to Brownsville. In recent years, southern Texas and the border region had seen periodic disturbances between American soldiers and local Chicanos who resented the military's presence. Soon after their arrival, black soldiers began complaining of police harassment and civilian discrimination. On the night of August 13, a group of unidentified men fired more than a hundred shots into private homes and businesses near the fort, killing a young bartender. A well-organized citizens' group accused the black infantrymen, prompting a U.S. Inspector General's investigation directed by Major Augustus Penrose. Penrose later concluded that a handful of soldiers had knowledge of the shooting, but the shooters' identities could not be discovered because the black troops refused to answer investigators' questions. On November 6, claiming a "conspiracy of silence" to protect their guilty comrades, President Theodore Roosevelt announced the dishonorable discharges of 167 men in Companies B, C, and D. To avoid further trouble with border residents, Fort Brown and neighboring Ringgold Barracks were closed in October. African-American leaders nationwide condemned Roosevelt's handling of "the Brownsville Affray." One study suggests this event marked the beginning of African Americans's abandonment of their historical loyalty to the Republican Party. From 1907 to 1910, the U.S. Senate reexamined the case and eventually allowed fourteen infantrymen to reenlist but upheld the summary guilty verdict. In the 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense reduced the discharges to honorable status. tcxpi #otd #BlackMonth #DailyBlackHistoryFact #onthisdayintcxpihistory

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Find out jinseinoiro's Instagram Hoy os dejo una ilustración muy especial para mí de una personita increíble, gracias @shaunelay por dejarme compartir tu arte.
#Black #DarkSensations #BlackMonth #Darkness #MesNegro #JinseiNoIro #Blackcolour #Choosyourcolor #Emotions #Illustration #Photodraphy #FirstMonth
#child #whale #night 1576753170247800825_5828715300

Hoy os dejo una ilustración muy especial para mí de una personita increíble, gracias @shaunelay por dejarme compartir tu arte. #black #darksensations #BlackMonth #darkness #mesnegro #jinseinoiro #blackcolour #choosyourcolor #emotions #illustration #photodraphy #FirstMonth #child #whale #night

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Find out ethiopianworld_'s Instagram On This Day In TCXPI History

Claudius W. Rice was a Political Activist and Labor Leader in Houston, Texas from the 1920s through the 1940s. 
He was the owner of Negro Labor News, president of the Texas Negro Business Association, and advocate of Booker T. Washington and the Tuskegee philosophy of self help.�� Rice was born in 1897 to Mary and Ezekiel Rice in Haywood County, Tennessee. Formally educated in the rural schools of Haywood County, in 1909 he moved to the city of  Jackson, Tennessee and worked as a domestic servant while enrolled in the Lane College high school department.�� Rice then moved to Houston, Texas, and by 1914 was giving lectures to local blacks about their patriotic duty to support the United States if it entered World War I.  Rice's patriotic fervor lessened however after touring the Deep South and witnessing firsthand the racial discrimination African Americans faced.  He then began his quest to eliminate discrimination and racism.�� While in Houston, Rice became an entrepreneur, using his position to rally local blacks into challenging discrimination and focusing attention on the unfair treatment of the region’s black workforce. He stirred controversy within the black and white Houston communities in his encouragement for blacks to “organize in a solid bloc” and use racial solidarity as an effective weapon to challenge their plight. �� By World War II, Rice became an advocate of the Double Victory campaign. In his speeches he called for a “two front war,” hoping to increase black patriotism and white respect for African Americans by urging their support of the war effort.  He also called on Houston business owners to improve working conditions for working class blacks in the city.�� Throughout his career Rice argued for racial unity. His avowed social and political conservatism and his insistence distancing himself and openly criticizing other black Houston leaders cost him the support of some of his potential followers and curtailed his effectiveness as a spokesperson for Houston's African Americans.�� Rice died on August 6, 1973 from head injuries due to a fall. 1576166015216283122_5024776273

On This Day In TCXPI History Claudius W. Rice was a Political Activist and Labor Leader in Houston, Texas from the 1920s through the 1940s. He was the owner of Negro Labor News, president of the Texas Negro Business Association, and advocate of Booker T. Washington and the Tuskegee philosophy of self help.�� Rice was born in 1897 to Mary and Ezekiel Rice in Haywood County, Tennessee. Formally educated in the rural schools of Haywood County, in 1909 he moved to the city of Jackson, Tennessee and worked as a domestic servant while enrolled in the Lane College high school department.�� Rice then moved to Houston, Texas, and by 1914 was giving lectures to local blacks about their patriotic duty to support the United States if it entered World War I. Rice's patriotic fervor lessened however after touring the Deep South and witnessing firsthand the racial discrimination African Americans faced. He then began his quest to eliminate discrimination and racism.�� While in Houston, Rice became an entrepreneur, using his position to rally local blacks into challenging discrimination and focusing attention on the unfair treatment of the region’s black workforce. He stirred controversy within the black and white Houston communities in his encouragement for blacks to “organize in a solid bloc” and use racial solidarity as an effective weapon to challenge their plight. �� By World War II, Rice became an advocate of the Double Victory campaign. In his speeches he called for a “two front war,” hoping to increase black patriotism and white respect for African Americans by urging their support of the war effort. He also called on Houston business owners to improve working conditions for working class blacks in the city.�� Throughout his career Rice argued for racial unity. His avowed social and political conservatism and his insistence distancing himself and openly criticizing other black Houston leaders cost him the support of some of his potential followers and curtailed his effectiveness as a spokesperson for Houston's African Americans.�� Rice died on August 6, 1973 from head injuries due to a fall.

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Find out willg45's Instagram Just and epic cool collage of me winning everyday😎😎😎 hahah Like for more content #minions #funny #quotes #me #lol #cool #whiteday #whitepower #blackmonth #somethinglikethat 1575251360433415817_2321560858

Just and epic cool collage of me winning everyday😎😎😎 hahah Like for more content #minions #funny #quotes #me #lol #cool #whiteday #whitepower #blackmonth #somethinglikethat

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